Category Archives: Book

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My LITTLE BLUE BOOK OF BIBLIOMANCY — out 2/17!

Little-Blue-Book

Happy to announce that my A Little Blue Book of Bibliomancy is being added to Borderlands Press’s prestigious “Little Book” line, so I’m joining the ranks of Neil Gaiman, Peter Straub, Joe Lansdale, and other fine scribes.  It’s a signed and limited edition of 500 copies, and is due to be released February 17th, just a few days away. As for its contents, there’s a real grab-bag of prose here. I’ll let Borderlands Press tell you about it:

Continue reading My LITTLE BLUE BOOK OF BIBLIOMANCY — out 2/17!

The Night Listener & Others

nightlistenerThe Night Listener and Others, my second collection of short stories and novellas, was published in May 2015 by the UK’s PS Publishing. Peter Crowther and his staff did a beautiful job with this limited edition hardcover, with a wraparound dustjacket by Jill Bauman, an introduction by Richard Christian Matheson, and 22 stories, none of which were in my earlier collection. At the back of the book are my own notes and comments on each story. The book is available in a boxed, signed, and numbered edition, as well as a standard hardcover.  I can’t resist quoting from RC’s introduction: “For those privileged few, lucky enough to be new to the miraculous Chet Williamson, you are about to enter worlds of glorious and sinister wonder. I envy you.”

Andrew Vachss Underground

undergroundI scripted and helped to edit a lengthy graphic novel based on an unpublished screenplay by Andrew Vachss for Dark Horse Comics. Mike Richardson scripted the first 24 pages, which appeared serially in DARK HORSE PRESENTS, and I wrote the remainder of the 144 page book, Andrew Vachss Underground, a gorgeous hardcover with art by Dominic Reardon.

Though there are similarities between this graphic novel and a four-issue run of UNDERGROUND  back in the mid-90s, this is an all new creation  and story, and I was delighted to be a part of it.

Defenders of the Faith

Crossroad Press trade paperback edition

Defenders of the Faith is my first novel that was an ebook original from Crossroad Press, though the trade paperback followed shortly thereafter. It’s a horror novel crossed with a suspense thriller, and there’s no supernatural element.

The book is an exploration into what happens when one’s religious faith comes up against one’s reason. It’s told from the point of view of a basically good man who crosses the threshold of violence, and discovers that he has inspired a young and even more crazed disciple.

Fearnet said: “This isn’t a simple tale.  It is full of contradictions, in the way that life is full of contradictions.  There is no distinct line between good and bad and right and wrong.  As a study of a truly tragic character, Defenders of the Faith is one of modern horror’s best examples.”

Horror Drive-In added: “Chet Williamson is a complicated writer and Defenders of the Faith is a complicated novel. I’m not saying that it’s stodgy or overly intellectual. This is a lightning-paced thriller. It’s just that Chet doesn’t present right and wrong in clearly defined terms. You won’t find the good guys wearing white hats and the bad guys with black ones on their heads…Defenders of the Faith is a book for the ages.”

Welcome to my book page…

…Here you’ll find the various books I’ve written over the years, with my comments and anecdotes about them.

Some are actually still in print.

If you’d like to leave any notes or comments yourself, please feel free to do so. Those that convey the message, “I hate your work. Die, die,” will probably be deleted, unless you hate my work and/or wish me to die die in a particularly colorful or amusing way.

The Story of Noichi the Blind

The Story of Noichi the Blind
The Story of Noichi the Blind (Cemetery Dance Publications, 2007)

The novella is my favorite length in which to write horror, so when Richard Chizmar requested a novella for Cemetery Dance’s hardcover novella series, I immediately started thinking about what to write.

My son Colin moved to Japan when he was still in college, transferring to Temple’s Tokyo campus and then staying there after graduation, working first for Anchor and then for Square Enix as a videogame designer. My fondness for all things Japanese has increased during his tenure there and our many visits. And one of the things I have long liked about Japan has been the writer Lafcadio Hearn. So I decided to create a “rediscovered” Hearn story which I would then “edit” with the help of the fictitious Alan Drew, Ph.D., a Hearn scholar.

The result was The Story of Noichi the Blind, complete with an introduction telling how my son found the story and sent it to me, and how the manuscript’s  typeface was identified by the very real Richard Polt, who is an expert in antique typewriters and also runs the Harry Stephen Keeler website. The story follows, and the volume ends with an Afterword by Dr. Drew in which, through textual analysis, he concludes that the tale is not by Hearn, but by an unknown admirer living in Japan sometime before 1940.

The whole creation was a delight to concoct, and the story itself is one of the most disgusting things I’ve ever set to paper, though told in a classic, fairytale manner that somehow makes it palatable. The reviewers seemed to have as much fun with it as I did, and my favorite comment was one from the Booklist reviewer who said, “This extraordinary performance makes such comparably transgressive writing as the Marquis de Sade’s seem totally crude.” Now that made my year.

The delightful cover painting is by the wonderful Jill Bauman (I own the framed initial monochromatic study she did for it). I have also turned the story into a play for puppet theatre, blending traditional Japanese puppetry with contemporary puppetry, in the hopes that somewhere, someday, someone will be twisted enough to undertake the project…

Pennsylvania Dutch Alphabet

Pennsylvania Dutch Alphabet
Pennsylvania Dutch Alphabet

Another picture book, this follow-up to my Pennsylvania Dutch Night Before Christmas has a four-line poem about the Pennsylvania Dutch for each letter of the alphabet, along with some explanatory text. Among the more predictable ones are “Quilt,” “Corn,” “Shoo-fly Pie,” and “Pretzels,” but I was stumped for “X” until my now deceased Pennsylvania Dutch friend, Lloyd Arthur Eshbach (founder of Fantasy Press and a science fiction pulp writer since 1929) suggested “X” as in: “The chicken lays the X.”

So I came up with “X is for eggs –/That’s how you pronounce them:/’Bring in the ecks!/Be sure not to bounce them!'”

The illustrations, much more faithful to the Pennsylvania Dutch culture, are by Alan Stacy, and the book is available from Pelican Publishing.

Figures in Rain

Figures in Rain
Figures in Rain (Ash-tree Press, 2002)

If I had to take along one book of mine with which to be stuck on a desert island, it would be this collection of many of my short stories. I had been a collector of Ash-tree Press volumes, since they specialize in classic ghost stories, and I’ve long been a fan of such tales in the vein of M. R. James, E. G. Swain, and others. So when they approached me to do a collection of my own supernatural tales, I leapt at the chance.

I arranged the volume in chronological order, with my very first story from a 1981 issue of Twilight Zone Magazine leading the way. I wrote detailed notes on every story, which were placed in the rear of the hefty volume (27 stories & over 300 pages of quite small print), and Joe Lansdale penned an introduction which still makes me blush whenever I read it. Three times a day. “He’s earned the right to be recognized as one of the finest writers of our generation. And generations beyond, I’m sure.” I love that Joe…

Others seemed to agree, since the reviews were fairly incandescent. The book was shortlisted for the World Fantasy Award, and won the International Horror Guild Award, while one of the two new stories I wrote for the book was nominated for the IHG Award as well. The book is still available from Ash-tree…

Uniting Work and Spirit: A Centennial History of Elizabethtown College

Uniting Work & Spirit: A Centennial History of Elizabethtown College
Uniting Work & Spirit (Elizabethtown College Press, 2001)

This is the first and only college history I have ever written or will ever write. I was commissioned to write the centennial history of Elizabethtown College, a small liberal arts college founded by the Church of the Brethren in my town. I’d never written a non-fiction book before, but someone at the college thought that a writer like me would produce a much more readable and engaging book than most dry-as-dust historians would turn out. I like to think they were right.

I wrote the history about the people who built and nurtured the college, and not the college itself, and it was a much more fascinating journey than I had thought. Though I was offered research assistants, I chose to do all the research myself, and went through every issue of the college newspaper, every yearbook, endless piles of college catalogues and more. I dug into the archives, uncovering some scandalous stories about the college founders, and showing that J. G. Francis, considered the George Washington of the school, was in fact a petty, vindictive man who ultimately tried to destroy the school because he felt as though he had been under-appreciated by those who took control.

Unfortunately, I spent an entire year researching and writing the history, a year that, as it turned out, could have been more wisely spent, at least in financial terms. If you’re interested in having me write a history of your college, my price will start in the mid-six figures.

Only real completists would want this book, available in hardcover and paperback. But if you do, the E-town College Bookstore has it…